Summer Intern 2019: Danny Lester

 

Forget Game of Thrones and Avengers: Endgame; this summer’s blockbuster is at SageBroadview, where we are pleased to employ another summer intern who’s hot on the path to becoming a financial planner.

Danny Lester graduated from Farmington (CT) High School in 2016, just completed his bachelor’s in finance from Boston’s  Bentley University (in only three years – thank you, AP credits!), was an RA for two of those years, and will be returning to Bentley in the fall to begin a one-year program for a master’s degree in taxation.  This summer we intend to introduce Danny to many aspects of the financial planning business, both client-facing and back office.

He’ll spend a little time in each of our offices, so be on the lookout – perhaps he’ll visit with you in an upcoming meeting!  Whether you have a chance to meet him in person or not, please take a minute to get to know Danny in his own words.

Why finance/financial planning?

I’ve been interested in money ever since my parents gave me and my sister “state quarter maps” when we were 5 or 6 years old. Financial planning came a little later, due to a combination of events. My uncle is a financial planner, so he inspired my early interest in the field. Then, during my first year at Bentley University, I took a Corporate Finance course. I realized then that I found personal finance more fulfilling.

What led you to us?

Last fall, I began looking for a Finance internship for this summer. The only ones being advertised were for corporate finance rotational programs. I knew that wasn’t what I wanted, so I used Google to search for “financial planning firms near me.” That’s how I found SageBroadview. I sent an email, explaining who I was and what I was looking for – and, fortunately, you replied. After an interview with Larry Annello, your team agreed to take a chance on me. Now that I’m here, I’m quickly realizing how lucky I was with my Google query.

What’s in store for you next fall?

I’ll continue my program toward my master’s degree in taxation. I was able to take one course this spring, but I’ll start as a full-time graduate student in August. I also am a Resident  Assistant, and I had my RA assignment switched to working with first-year students in the upcoming year. This should be an exciting new spin on the role.

When you’re not studying or working?

When I’m not studying or working, I am most likely doing something sports-related. My friends and I have joined intramural teams for every sport that Bentley offers, which gives us  games on most nights throughout the semester. I’m a Boston sports fan, but I’ll watch almost any team.

Your definition of “success?

I’ve been fortunate enough to have great family dynamics growing up, so having a good work-life balance is important to me. In that sense, I see work success as being a long-term goal. It’s when you can afford to put life before work, and not be too concerned about the consequences.

Favorite life experience?

Last summer, I went on a family trip to Italy, traveling abroad for the first time. It was interesting to see all the big and small cultural differences between the U.S. and Italy. My dad and I are also history nerds, so it was great to see some of the ancient Roman buildings, and walk through the old Roman forum.

Most important value?

I’ve always been relatively introverted, so for me, trust is very important. From trust stems other values such as dependability, loyalty, and an overall sense of security in any interpersonal relationship.

 

SAGE Serendipity: If you have apps that alert you to crime in your neighborhood, or a doorbell that monitors your front stoop, you may be feeling you live in a very dangerous world.  Take a breath and read this from The New York TimesApps That Blast Out Crime Alerts Don’t Have to Rattle You

“The seemingly constant barrage of news about criminal activity could lead people to conclude that the world is far more dangerous than it ever was. The reality is that the violent-crime rate in the United States has fallen sharply — by about 49 percent from 1993 to 2017, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Property crime has also declined significantly.”

Sheri Iannetta Cupo
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