SBV Curated Content | A Weekly Update of Enlightening & Intriguing Information | June 23, 2021

Businesses, Stock Markets & the Economy

History Shows That Stock Gains Can Add Up After Big Declines. (Dimensional)

“Sudden market downturns can be unsettling. But historically, US equity returns following sharp downturns have, on average, been positive.”

Why Interest Rates Have to Stay Low For a Very Long Time (Ben Carlson)

Ford vs. Tesla (Ben Carlson)

Your Finances & other Wealth Management links

Take the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) wellbeing survey. –>Can you measure your Financial Well-being? (TEBI)

Gen Z: Why It Is Never Too Early to Start Planning for Retirement (Let’s Make a Plan)

The Environment & ESG (Environmental, Social & Governance) Investing

Visualizing Earth’s Global Ice Loss Between 1994-2017 (Visual Capitalist)

 

Your Physical & Mental Well-being

How to be a Caregiver (The New York Times)

“Even if you’re not a caregiver now, odds are that you will find yourself in the role someday. In the United States about one in five adults is providing unpaid health or supportive care to someone they love — an aging parent, a family member or child with a disability or a spouse, partner or friend with an illness. We asked experts on caregiving and aging, as well as dozens of people who have been caregivers themselves, for their best advice to help the next generation of caregivers.”

Let’s Do a Tick Check “These pervasive bloodsuckers can give you more than just Lyme disease. Here’s how to protect yourself.” (The New York Times)

Lifelong Exercise Adds Up to Big Health Care Savings. “People who start to exercise before or during middle age typically save from $824 to $1,874 annually on health care costs after retirement.” (The New York Times)

This Week’s Serendipity

Blink. (Michael Batnick)

“Health is the only thing that matters. We all know this. But some people know it more than others. Losing my mother hurt like hell, but I’m grateful for what came of it. It taught me not to take anything in life for granted, especially life itself. Years aren’t promised, so I try to enjoy every day.

I don’t think about death often, if ever. But maybe in my subconscious, I think about it all the time. Losing my mom made me aggressively live my life. Probably too much when I was younger, but over time I learned to strike the right balance.”

Sheri Iannetta Cupo
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