SBV Curated Content | A Weekly Update of Enlightening & Intriguing Information | August 4, 2021

Businesses, Stock Markets & the Economy

9 Questions For The Bull Market “Bull markets are way more fun than bear markets, but they can also warp your brain.” ( Ben Carlson)

Cryptocurrencies: Do they serve the public interest? (Evidence Investor)

“In its annual economic report, the Swiss-based Bank for International Settlements — the coordinating agent for central banks — argues that while there is a public interest case for digital money, existing crypto currencies are not the answer.

“By now, it is clear that cryptocurrencies are speculative assets rather than money, and in many cases are used to facilitate money laundering, ransomware attacks and other financial crimes,” the BIS says in its report. “Bitcoin, in particular, has few redeeming public interest attributes when also considering its wasteful energy footprint.””

Your Finances & other Wealth Management links

If I had to convince my 22-year-old self to save more money, here is what I would say: Go big, then stop. (Of Dollars and Data)

“Why is this strategy so effective? There are two reasons:

    1. Money invested earlier in time typically grows more than money invested later in time.
    2. Compounding money is easier than saving money.”

 

10 Best Investment/Retirement Accounts: Differences and Overview (Thomas Kopelman)

The Environment & ESG (Environmental, Social & Governance) Investing

Erik Vance has advice for the anxious in What to Do About Climate Despair (Tara Parker-Pope, The New York Times Well)

Why You Should Plant Oaks. “These large, long-lived trees support more life-forms than any other trees in North America. And they’re magnificent.” (The New York Times)

Your Physical & Mental Well-being

Try Belly Breathing! (Tara Parker-Pope, The New York Times Well)

“I’m a fan of Harvard Medical School’s health newsletters, which are packed with gems of advice. (Click on this link to sign up.) This week’s newsletter offered a lesson on the value of “belly breaths,” which help you take in more oxygen than if you take shallower breaths from your upper chest.

Here’s their advice:

    • To learn belly breathing, lie faceup with one hand on your navel.
    • As you inhale, expand your belly, pulling more air down into the lower part of the lungs. Your hand should rise as your belly expands.
    • As you exhale, contract your belly and push the air out so your hand falls.
    • Practice this (lying down or sitting) two or three times a day, taking at least 10 breaths each time, and try it while you run.
    • If you start panting during your run or notice your shoulders and chest are going up and down, you’re chest breathing. Slow to a walk, catch your breath, and try again.”

 

Why you shouldn’t soak a splinter, and other ways first aid has changed (The Washington Post)

This Week’s Serendipity

Sheri Iannetta Cupo
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