SBV Curated Content | A Weekly Update of Enlightening & Intriguing Information | August 25, 2021

Businesses, Stock Markets & the Economy

Schwab Market Perspective: The Next Phase (Schwab)

Although we’re not out of the pandemic yet, the economy is showing encouraging signs. Job growth has been strong and financial markets appear to confirm that the economic cycle has shifted from recovery to expansion. Global earnings estimates are being revised upward and global business leaders are expressing fewer concerns about supply constraints than earlier this year. Given these signs, the Federal Reserve may start tapering its support for the economy sooner than expected.

Which isn’t to say there aren’t market risks out there, including the spread of the COVID-19 delta variant, overly bullish investor sentiment (a contrarian indicator when taken to extremes), and the return of the federal government’s debt ceiling. Let’s take a deeper look:”

 

Your Finances & other Wealth Management links

Does everything really cost more? Find out with our inflation quiz. (Washington Post)

Tips for Obtaining Your First Mortgage (letsmakeaplan.org)

“The prospect of taking on a mortgage can be scary for a first-time home buyer. CFP Board Ambassador Louis Barajas, CFP® explains how proper planning can help ease your home-buying worries.”

 

The Environment & ESG (Environmental, Social & Governance) Investing

Fall Yard Clean-Up. The Lifesaving Habit of Untidying Up (CAROLLE HUBER , EDIBLE JERSEY) 

“Our insect population has decreased approximately 45 percent since the 1970s. Threatened by pesticides and habitat loss, their numbers are still declining. There are some things we can do now to reverse that decline: Be less fanatic about your fall cleanup, and leave the leaves. It is where tons of insects overwinter—as adults, caterpillars, chrysalises, or eggs.”

These seven steps will ensure a healthy future for your lawn and garden:

    1. Seed any bare lawn areas, but be thoughtful not to over seed. Too much seed creates crowded plants and invites fungus.
    2. Aerate your lawn using a rented core aerator, especially in high-traffic areas. This will pull out soil plugs two to three inches deep, allowing nutrients, air, and water to penetrate. Do this when soil is moist. Seed right after and add compost or compost tea. Leave plugs to decompose.
    3. Wrap young trees to keep deer from using them as scratching posts. They’ll strip the bark and kill your tree! Instead of ugly plastic, Edwina von Gal of PRFCT EARTH PRJCT uses twine. Wrap loosely around the trunk “barbershop pole style” from about four feet high down. Remove in the spring or let it rot away.
    4. Water your garden well, then turn off your irrigation for the winter.
    5. Leave the leaves to insulate and feed the soil. Mulch them with your mower if they are in the lawn; just leave them whole in your planting beds. Shredded leaves don’t provide the same cover for eggs and caterpillars, but they will break down quickly in the lawn and fertilize your soil.
    6. Put down your pruners. Don’t polish off a whole population of insects that will be overwintering in your garden. Don’t cut back canes, stalks, and other standing plants. Protect the insects’ habitat all winter and they will reward you in spring by serving as early pollinators, and by eating aphids and other nuisance bugs.
    7. Put up a sign that says: “Pollinator Habitat.” I am being sarcastic, but I bet it will quiet up your neighbor who has a suspiciously green chem-lawn and stares down your “mess.” Etsy has some great ones.”

 

Your Physical & Mental Well-being

Once Again, Travelers Ask: ‘Should I Cancel My Trip?’ “For travel-starved Americans, the Delta variant has brought the return of a practice well-honed by the pandemic: waiting.” (The New York Times)

Help! What Will I Need to Show When Traveling, and Where? “Proof of vaccination has become increasingly vital to accessing local restaurants and distant countries alike. Our columnist takes a deeper dive into what that means for travelers.” (The New York Times) Once Again, Travelers Ask: ‘Should I Cancel My Trip?’ “For travel-starved Americans, the Delta variant has brought the return of a practice well-honed by the pandemic: waiting.” (The New York Times)

Schools already mandate a raft of vaccinations. So what’s different about Covid? (theatlantic.com)

Why Delta has pushed aside other variants. (statnews.com)

But one key factor is that by cutting how much the virus replicates — both through preventing infections and by shortening the infections that do occur — vaccines limit the likelihood of additional, more dangerous variants. People who are protected against the virus can act as evolutionary dead ends.”

 

This Week’s Serendipity  

They deserve a place in history’: music teacher makes map of female composers (Guardian)

View the map here.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his sister, Maria Anna, who was also a child musical prodigy, at the piano.

Sheri Iannetta Cupo
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