Sheri's Reading June

What Sheri’s Been Reading: June 2015 Edition

 Sheri's Reading June

  • Can your portfolio survive rising interest rates? (Fortune) It’s the question that everyone has been asking. Here’s a guide to whether your portfolio will be able to withstand the coming rate hike cycle, whether it begins this fall or sometime in early 2016. (Hint: You should be fine as long as you are properly diversified.) 
  • The 5 Rules of Personal Finance That Everyone Should Memorize (themuse)Most people spend their 20s messing up their money, their 30s trying to figure out what they did wrong, their 40s trying to dig out of the hole, and their 50s trying to catch up for retirement.” 
  • The psychology behind market crashes (BloombergView) “Warren Buffett’s quote, “In the business world, the rear view mirror is always clearer than the windshield,” is even more applicable to investing.”
  • To Win You Have to be Willing to Lose (A Wealth of Common Sense) “Losses are a normal part of a well-functioning market.”
  • The Best Diversifier Has Been the Simplest (Morningstar) What has often been viewed as the most simplistic asset class available, high-quality bonds, form a perfect combination when blended with equity holdings.
  • How to block out the media when making important financial decisions (The Motley Fool) But notice what you don’t see. There are no stock tickers. No Bloomberg terminals. No charting software. No Twitter feeds. No pundits spouting forecasts. No computer monitors, and maybe not even a calculator.” 
  • Financial Advice for New College Grads (The Wall Street Journal) How to (and why) every recent college graduate should make their paycheck the center of their financial plan.
  • The charity that everyone on Wall Street is talking about (Business Insider) After a near death experience, a Bank of America VP starts a charity to promote the treatment that saved him: ECMO. But what exactly is it?
  • Why financial advisors do more than just manage your money. (CNBC) “Financial advisors are deepening their relationships with clients by addressing their intellectual, emotional and social needs. In addition to their traditional roles as financial planners, advisors are serving as thinking partners, therapists, surrogate family members and community organizers.”

 



nat geo photo contestSage Serendipity:
10 stunning portraits from the 2015 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest.


 

Sheri Iannetta Cupo
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